Project WHOTS - WHOI Hawaii Ocean Time-series Station

Sponsors
to NOAA Web sitePrincipal funding is provided by NOAA Climate Program Office. (CPO).
Cruise reportCruise reportCruise reportCruise report
More Details
WHOTS-I
Mooring diagram
Mooring log
Hydrographic Observations at the WHOI-HOT Site (WHOTS): 2004 - 2006
WHOTS-II
Mooring diagram
Mooring log
Cruise report
WHOTS-III
Mooring diagram
Mooring log
Cruise report
WHOTS-IV
Mooring diagram
Mooring log
Cruise report
WHOTS-V
Mooring diagram
Mooring log
Cruise report
WHOTS-VI
Mooring diagram
Mooring log
Cruise report
WHOTS-VII
Mooring diagram
Mooring log
Cruise report
WHOTS-VIII
Mooring diagram
Mooring log
WHOTS-IX
Mooring diagram
Mooring log
WHOTS-X
Mooring diagram
Mooring log
WHOTS-XI
Mooring diagram
Mooring log
WHOTS-XII
Mooring diagram
Mooring log
WHOTS-XIII
Mooring diagram
Mooring log

Research

The Hawaii Ocean Timeseries (HOT) site, 100 km north of Oahu, Hawaii, has been occupied since 1988 as a part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) and the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS). WOCE investigators sought to document and understand seasonal and interannual variability of water masses, relate water mass variations to gyre fluctuations, and develop a climatology of high-frequency physical variability. JGOFS investigators sought to use information about primary production, new production, and particle export from the surface ocean as part of an interdisciplinary research program. The present HOT program includes comprehensive, interdisciplinary upper ocean observations, but does not include continuous surface forcing observations. Thus, the primary intent of the WHOTS mooring is to provide long-term, high-quality air-sea fluxes as a coordinated part of the HOT program and contribute to the goals of observing heat, fresh water and chemical fluxes at a site representative of the oligotrophic North Pacific Ocean.

Moorings

The surface mooring will be maintained for several years to obtain and examine in-situ records of surface meteorology, air-sea fluxes, and upper ocean variability. A Surlyn foam surface buoy is equipped with meteorological instrumentation including two complete Air-Sea Interaction Meteorological (ASIMET) systems, measuring air and sea surface temperatures, relative humidity, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, incoming shortwave and longwave radiation, and precipitation. Complete surface meteorological time series is recorded every minute, as necessary to compute air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater and momentum. Each ASIMET system also transmits hourly averages of the surface meteorological variables via the Argos satellite system.

The mooring line is instrumented in order to collect accurate time series of upper ocean temperatures, velocities, and salinities co-incident with the surface forcing record. Subsurface instrumentation is being supplied by the University of Hawaii. This includes vector measuring current meters, conductivity, salinity and temperature recorders, and an Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP).


Field Work

Deployment times of the buoys:

Deployment Date Water Depth
1 2004-08-13 4693
2 2005-07-28 4695
3 2006-06-27 4704
4 2007-06-26 4756
5 2008-06-05 4702
6 2009-07-11 4758
7 2010-07-29 4704
8 2011-07-07 4750
9 2012-06-14 4668
10 2013/07/11 4756
11 2014/07/17 4707
12 2015/07/12 4722
13 2016/06/27 4693



Updated: June 30 2016